It all started with a spreadsheet. Or more precisely, the idea for Pods, or local 500 Women Scientists chapters, took flight from a spreadsheet we used to organize thousands of women scientists across the world to march together in the 2017 Women’s March.

In the early 500 Women Scientists days, a small group of women scientists were hustling to harness the momentum from our open letter, recognizing the deep need for connection and community after the 2016 US Presidential Election. While organizing for the Women’s March, we created a spreadsheet of women who who wanted to march together in their…

In the beginning of January 2021, I stepped into the role of Executive Director of 500 Women Scientists, and I cannot be more excited to help shape the vision and set a course for the next chapter of our organization — one that is unapologetically equity and justice focused, rooted in collective action, and sustainable for years to come.

Lauren Edwards, 500 Women Scientists Executive Director

I joined 500 Women Scientists as a volunteer in April 2019 after learning about an upcoming fellowship program from my mentor Mónica-Feliú-Mójer at Yale Ciencia Academy. I didn’t know anything about the organization, but I was intrigued to hear that a…

Decades of emphasis and concerted efforts have not adequately addressed inequities in science, from lack of pay parity to lack of acknowledgement of the scientific contributions and accomplishments of women and non-binary individuals. For too long, the loudest and most overrepresented voices of science in the public were from cis white men — their perspectives are elevated and amplified in high-profile articles, conference panels, and boards. Media stories are assigned, reported, and presented by men by a huge margin, and this imbalance is reflected in how frequently women are consulted and quoted. Most keynote speakers at conferences are men. …

Photo by Clay Banks on Unsplash

To our fellow Black women, sisters, friends, & confidants,

We felt compelled to take time to express our collective grief, outrage, disappointment, and utter exasperation about the state of affairs facing Black folks in the United States, and more broadly, around the world. As we write this, protestors are fighting in Nigeria to end the brutalization at the hands of the Special Anti-Robbery Squad #EndSARS. We stand strongly with our sisters and brothers in realizing that a threat to a Black person anywhere, is a threat to Black people everywhere.

Breonna Taylor was killed by police in the United States…

Alice Cunha da Silva, Ana P. S. Carvalho, Daniele de Azevêdo Baeta, Danila Carrijo da Silva Dias, Janaína Dutra Silvestre Mendes, Jaqueline A. A. Calábria. On behalf of 500 Women Scientists and Women in Nuclear Brasil\

This article was originally published in Portugese by O Tempo. Read or listen to it there!

Scientists in lab coats holding signs at the Rally To Stand Up For Science in Boston. (Photo Credit: Amanda Kowalski for ClimateTruth.org)

Between the acknowledgement of the first case of COVID-19 in China and the first one recorded in Brazil, there was a gap of almost two months. This would have been enough time for the Brazilian government to define national strategies and actions in response to the new threat…

Almost four years ago, we wrote a pledge affirming our commitment to build a more inclusive society and scientific enterprise. On the heels of the November 2016 U.S. Presidential election, our pledge garnered more than 10,000 signatures in the first month and we harnessed the moment to build a global movement. We built a leadership team, defined our mission, and got to work making science more open, inclusive, and accessible. Vanessa Smith, an artist from Atlanta, Georgia, offered to design a logo. She incorporated a drawing of the flower from the photo we published with our pledge. …

By: Francesca Bernardi, Alison Marklein & Anila Yadavalli

Close your eyes and imagine a scientist — what do you see? Do you see someone who is creative? A dancer? An artist? A filmmaker? Do you see a woman? A woman of color? Popular portrayals of science depict a homogenous cast of characters playing with data, graphs, and charts. But in recent years, scientists and non-scientists alike have revelled in film adaptations that delve into the complicated lives of mathematicians and engineers (Hidden Figures, The Man who Knew Infinity) and scientists are starting to get prime billing in popular films and…

Women’s March 2017 (photo by Wendy Bohon)

“We find our people. We organize. And we resist!”

Dr. Anjali Kumar

One day after Trump was inaugurated, on a brisk January morning, we gathered with other scientists, put on our lab coats, grabbed homemade protest signs, and walked down to the National Mall in Washington DC. A similar scene played out all over the world as millions of people showed up for the Women’s March, the largest coordinated protest in history.

Dr. Kim Cobb said in her speech at the Atlanta Women’s March “if we are going to fight for facts, and data, and truth, and justice, then we’re…

In December 2018, we launched 500 Women in Medicine (500WIM) as a satellite of the main 500 Women Scientists organization in an effort to reach more women in the medical sciences. Many women in medicine do not identify as scientists but do engage in scientific inquiry and research as part of their jobs. Our goal was to create a home within 500 Women Scientists for these women and to bring attention to the underrepresentation of women in medicine more broadly. …

As we prepare to attend Women’s Marches all over the US and world, we wanted to take this opportunity to address some of the controversies associated with this year’s march and reaffirm our commitment to march for equality and justice in an inclusive and intersectional way.

Background and context

The national Women’s March organization and specifically two march co-chairs (Linda Sarsour and Tamika Mallory) have been criticized for their refusal to distance themselves from Louis Farrakhan, a leader of the Nation of Islam who has a long history of anti-Semitism and who has openly attacked LGBTQ communities. Additionally, there have…

500 Women Scientists

Working to make science open, inclusive, and accessible.

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